Small, indie brands are having their moment—and savvy spa directors are catching on

By : Mary Bemis
Founder & Editorial Director at InsidersGuidetoSpas.com

“The first time they dropped off stuff, I didn’t even want to look at it. I gave it to my staff,” shares Michael Conte, spa director at Meadowood Napa Valley. Conte is reminiscing about the first time Kim Borio, founder of Glycelene, and her husband, Eric a biologist and cosmetic chemist and Glycelene’s Chief Technology Officer, brought Conte their luxury, plant-based skincare line to test. But when the couple returned a month later, Conte changed his tune after he met them in person. “They’re such a great couple,” he enthuses. “I have to say, the partnership I have with Kim and Eric has been extraordinary. When you’re working with a luxury property and spa, you want to have something unique that you won’t find elsewhere.”

Been There, Heard That

How to Create a Standout Beauty Brand

By Kimberly Brizzolara
Director Strategy & Editorial, Bartlett Brands

Been there, done that, put it on my face yesterday. We all know that the beauty landscape is crazy crowded. So how does a brand stand out on shelves stacked high with bouncy cloud cream-serums and insta-feeds throwing every shade? Find the nugget that’s unique about your brand—and turn it into the foundational rock.

Discovering Beauty at Amazon: How To Get Your Brand In the Cart


Amazon is a force that’s here to stay with online beauty retailing and has huge pull felt across the omni-channel retail platforms. Consider these numbers: Amazon accounted for about $2.5 billion in health and beauty sales last year which represented a 47% increase compared to 2015, One Click Retail estimates. Amazon’s continued dominance in all retail categories continues to impact the everyday beauty consumable brands we touch.

Thinking of starting your own beauty company??  Read this!

By Karen Young

cpna-1The statistics aren’t in your favor: According to Harvard Business School, over half of American startups are gone within 5 years. It’s a long, lonely haul. Money usually runs out too soon and friends and family crawl into the woodwork.

But no matter how many times I repeat the grim stats to perspective startup clients, no matter how many times I tell them that based on history and my experience, they’re living a long shot, it doesn’t seem to make any difference.

If they’ve been bitten by the entrepreneurial bug, there is no antidote. It’s as though they’ve been driven to the edge and nothing short of jumping off will quiet the voices in their heads.